Standards and content management go hand in hand. Content is stored in a definitive source as reusable elements that can be reassembled as required to form numerous and different information products. Because content can be used in so many different ways, it needs to conform to standards. You need standards for authoring, standards for making information accessible, standards for graphics. In this issue of The Rockley Report, content management practitioners deconstruct some of the standards, focusing on why standards are important, and how they impact content management. The March issue opens with a case study that describes how one company implemented DITA, the Darwin Information Typing Architecture. Wendy Shepperd, Information Development Manager for BMC Software describes how they are using DITA to pilot XML-based structured authoring and advanced content management. And, there’s much more…

Feature Article – Case Study: Using DITA to Develop a New Information Architecture at BMC Software

BMC Software is a leading provider of enterprise management solutions that empower companies to manage their IT infrastructures from a business perspective. Delivering Business Service Management (BSM), BMC Software solutions span enterprise systems, applications, databases, and service management. To better support the integration that BSM solutions provide, the Information Development organization is using the Darwin Information Typing Architecture (DITA) to pilot XML-based structured authoring and advanced content management.

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Tools and Technology – CMSML: A Standard for Describing and Classifying Content Management Systems

The number of content management systems is still growing strong. And with the trend of enterprise content management buy-outs and new players in the market, the complexity of these numerous content management systems increases. A means of describing and classifying content management systems would be helpful. This article, written by Erik Hartman, explores the ins and outs of CMSML, a markup language for content management systems provided by CM Professionals.

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Tools and Technology – Understanding the Scalable Vector Graphics Standard

In this easy-to-read article, Sara Porter explores the Scalable Vector Graphics (SVG) standard and explains why SVG is important to adopt and use. Porter provides a brief, high-level explanation of a very robust and deep technology, including what it is, why you should use it, and additional advantages of SVG.

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In the News – Content Management Standards of Interest to Content Managers

There are a variety of content standards that may come into play when developing content management solutions. This article by Scott Abel provides an overview of two useful standards that may be of interest to those creating learning content or serving the content needs of those with visual impairments.

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Best Practices – International Standards and their Impact on Technical Communication and Content Management

International Standards are becoming a fact of life in the world of business today. Conceivably, businesses in North America are required to meet quality standards as spelled out in ISO 9001, environmental standards as spelled out in ISO 14001, health and safety standards as spelled out in OHSAS 18001, regulatory standards like Sarbanes-Oxley and 21 CFR Part 11 as well as many other standards specific to the industry in which they operate, such as FAA, SAE, W3C. This article by Ralph Robinson discusses the need for standards and their and impact on business; who is responsible for their development and how they are developed; how they will impact technical communication and technical communicators world-wide; and why technical communicators need to become involved in their development.

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Information Architecture – Content Modeling to Assess Standards

With all the standards out there, can you just pick one and start authoring? Well, it depends. This article by Pamela Kostur describes content modeling to assess standards, focusing on determining expectations and ensuring the standard can meet those expectations.

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People, Process and Change – Content Management Systems and Web Standards

The World Wide Web Consortium (W3C) defines a set of standards for publishing content on the Web. The standards relate to the code used for adding structure to web pages, how those pages are presented to users, and scripting languages used to add dynamic elements to those pages. This article by Jim Byrne discusses why web standards are important in relation to Content Management Systems (CMS).

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